GetUpNGetFit

Nutrition Guidelines

Fruits and Vegetables

Nutrients

Potassium: Can help to maintain a blood pressure within a healthy range.

Fiber: Helps to reduce cholesterol, blood sugar, and lower risk of heart disease.

Also important in bowel function and helps reduce constipation. Provides a feeling of

fullness.

Vitamin C: For growth and repair of body tissues and helps heal cuts and wounds.

Folate also called Folic Acid: Helps in the formation of red blood cells.

Vitamin A: Protects against infections and keeps eyes and skin healthy.

 

Daily Recommendation *Can change based on physical activity and calorie needs*

Women: 1 ½ -2 cups;

Men: 2 cups

(1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit)

  • Fresh, Canned or Frozen?

Fruit and Vegetable picked fresh are the best choice, because the nutrients are still retained.

Canned and frozen options are good too, but they should be canned or frozen right after being harvested.

Opt for products which have no salt added.

Steaming vegetables instead of boiling them for long periods can also help with nutrient retention.

  • Seasonal

Fruits and vegetables can taste better and cost less when they are in season. The environment also benefits from less carbon footprint needed to deliver these foods, and it also helps the business of local farmers.

 

Some Fruits and Vegetables:

 


 

 Apples

Bananas           

Beets  

Brussels Sprouts          

Cabbage           

Carrots

Kale     

Leeks

Lemons

Onions              

Oranges            

Parsnips           

Pears

Pineapple    

Potatoes 

Pumpkins   

Rutabagas        

Sweet Potatoes and Yams

Turnips

Winter Squash 

 

Grains

Nutrients

Fiber: Helps to reduce cholesterol and lower risk of heart disease. Also important in bowel function and helps reduce constipation. Provides a feeling of fullness.

B Vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin): Plays a role in metabolism and energy. Also needed for a healthy immune system.

Folate also called Folic Acid: Helps in the formation of red blood cells.

Iron: Carries oxygen in the blood. Foods rich in vitamin C aids in the absorption of non-heme iron foods (non-meat sources).

*Whole Grains are great sources of magnesium, which is used for bone building and muscle energy release and selenium, which protects cells from oxidation damage and builds a healthy immune system.

 

Daily Recommendation *Can change based on physical activity and calorie needs*

Women: 5-6 ounces;

Men: 6-8 ounces. At least half should be whole grains.

(1 slice of bread, 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal, or ½ cup of cooked rice, cooked pasta, or cooked cereal)

  • Whole grains

When choosing whole grains, don’t just buy based on color, this can be based on the addition of ingredients such as molasses.

Look at the nutrition facts label ingredient list, the first ingredient should have the words “whole grain”.Words such as "multi-grain," "stone-ground," "wheat," "seven-grain," or "bran" are usually not whole grain, just parts of it.

You may see or hear the words refined grains or enriched grains. This essentially means grains which are stripped of their nutrient filled (fiber and b vitamins) shells, and then nutrients added back in the case of enriched grains.  If you are looking to change up your meal, there are other choices for whole grains, other than brown rice and whole wheat bread.

 

Sorghum

Triticale

Rye

Wild Rice

 

Quinoa

Rolled Oats

Barley

Corn

 

Other Whole Grains:

Buckwheat

Bulgur

Millet

Oats

 

Dairy and Non-Dairy Calcium Foods   

Nutrients

Calcium: Used to build bones and teeth and maintaining bone mass.

Potassium: Can help to maintain a blood pressure within a healthy range.

Vitamin D: Helps build and maintain bones through proper calcium and phosphorus levels. 

*Diary and non-dairy sources (soy, almond) are fortified with this vitamin.

 

Daily Recommendation *Can change based on physical activity and calorie needs*

 

  • Other Calcium Options

Calcium is not only found in dairy. If you are looking to increase your calcium intake without the added fat, which comes with dairy, there are other options. These options should be your mean source for calcium.  

  • Green leafy vegetables (collard and turnip greens, kale, bok choy)

  • Canned fish such as sardines and salmon with bones

  • Soybeans and other soy products (tofu, soy yogurt, tempeh)

  • Calcium-fortified juices, cereals, breads, rice milk, or almond milk. *Be sure to check the labels for the nutrients involved

 

 

 

15 Foods that provide Calcium other than Cow Milk

 

  1. Kale (1 cup chopped [67 g] = 101 mg)*

  2. Broccoli (1 stalk [151 g] = 70 mg)*

  3. Cauliflower (1 cup chopped [107 g] = 24 mg)

  4. Brussels Sprouts (1 cup [88 g] = 33 mg)

  5. Turnips (1 medium [122 g] = 37 mg)

  6. Rutabagas (1 cup [140 g] = 60 mg)*

  7. Kohlrabi/ German cabbage (1 cup [135 g] = 32 mg)

  8. Collard Greens (1 cup chopped [36 g] = 84 mg)*

  9. Bok Choy (1 cup shredded [70 g] = 74 mg)*

  10. Okra (1 cup = 100 mg)*

  11. Mustard Seeds (1 tbsp [6.3 g] = 17 mg)

  12. Cabbage (1 leaf medium [23 g] = 9 mg)

  13. Almonds (1 cup whole [143 g] = 378 mg)*

  14. Coconut milk  (1 cup [240 g]= 38 mg)

  15. Soy Milk (1 cup [186 g] = 515 mg)*

*Higher calcium content

Carrots

 
 

Protein

Nutrients

Protein: Building block for bones, muscle, cartilage, skin and blood. Also for enzymes, hormones and vitamins.

B vitamins: Plays a role in metabolism and energy. Needed for a healthy immune system and

helps in the formation of red blood cells and tissues. 

Iron: Carries oxygen in the blood. Foods rich in vitamin C aids in the absorption of non-heme iron foods (non-meat sources).

Magnesium: Used for bone building and muscle energy release

Zinc: Needed for biochemical reactions and keeps the immune system healthy.

Omega 3 Fatty Acids (EPA and DHA): Found in seafood. Consumption of 8 ounces per week may help reduce the risk of heart disease.

Daily Recommendation *Can change based on physical activity and calorie needs*

Women: 5-5 ½ ounces;

Men: 5 ½ - 6 ounces

(1 ounce of meat, poultry or fish, ¼ cup cooked beans, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon of peanut butter, or ½ ounce of nuts or seeds)

  • Choose Lean

Some sources of protein can be high in saturated fat and cholesterol. These components can raise the bad (LDL) cholesterol levels, which can increase the risk for coronary heart disease. Foods in this group high in saturated fat include fatty cuts of meat, luncheon meat and some poultry.

Sources high in cholesterol (which can only be found in animal sources) include egg yolks and organ meats (liver and giblets).

To help when shopping for choose lean cuts, the label should read 95% or more lean. It also helps to remove the skin and fat from meat and poultry before cooking. Also cut back on the consumption of red meats, which are higher in saturated fat and cholesterol; if buying look for cuts of meat with less marbling throughout.